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Posts Tagged ‘Photography’

Even though this dark time of year usually makes me feel a bit of
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and today’s sh**ty ass weather fills me with
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I also feel
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because the good people at the UPI gallery (Laura, Sam and Dave), who inspire much

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in me, held an open call for this here group show
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and after I showed them
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they’ve sent me an email of
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for this body of work.

The opening is on Valentine’s Day and if the prospect of doing the same thing as the last 15 years fills you with
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or the crazy lines expected in restaurants make you feel
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then you should come and check out the show. And of course, don’t feel
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if you don’t have a date, cause we look forward to seeing you with much
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United Photo Industries HQ is located at:
111 Front Street, Suite 204
Brooklyn, NY, 11201

IT’S A THIN LINE BETWEEN LOVE AND HATE
THE 2013 EDITION
HATE: February 14 – 26
Artist Reception: Thursday, February 14, 6-9PM

Our two-part photo invitational has returned!

Exploring the twinned themes of Love, Hate, and the rugged terrain between them, photographers are invited to submit individual images exploring either (or both) elements of our exhibition’s emotionally conflicted theme.

On the surface, love – and its flip side, hate – might seem simple subjects to capture. Our daily lives are filled with mundane declarations of love, and mindless acts of hatred. But love and hate run deep. Look beneath the surface and you will often discover them masquerading as each other.

Please join us for the opening of “LOVE” (February 1, 6-9PM) and “HATE” (February 14, 6-9PM) in homage to February’s emotional roller-coaster and celebrate with us the wonderful work of :

Mariette Pathy Allen
Dirk Anschutz
Susan Barnett
Christopher Capozziello
Alejandra Carles-Tolra
James Carroll
Jodi Concecpcion
Stephanie Diani
Alessandro Falco
Akihiro Furuta
Glenna Gordon
Barbara Habenstreit
Alice Hale
Jamil Hellu
Howard Heyman
Cereal Lab
Ma Liang
Marcia Lloyd
Jennifer Loeber
Meg Lyding
Darius Mccallum
Nick Meyer
Peter Miraglia
Godelieve Mols
Keren Moscovitch
Laura Noel
Julie Nymann
Dominica Paige
Michelle Pedone
Alexis Percival
Hana Pesut
Thalassa Raasch
Jamel Shabazz
Ingrid Spangler
Maria Sprowls Cervantes
Sarah Szwajkos
David Taffet
Colin Todd
Rafael Vargas
Brennan Wesley
Vikky Wilkes
Laine Zimmerman

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Good friend and Heavy Light interviewee (?) Stefan Falke is running a Indie-Go-Go campaign to fund his (already) epic project about artists along the Mexican-US border. While he will probably miss his full funding goal, he can use every peso raised (here Indie-Go-Go is different from Kickstarter). The fundraiser is in it’s last days and in my opinion, the project is well worth our support.

Here is an official statement for the project:

New York based photographer Stefan Falke started to work with artists in Tijuana in 2008 in order to document an amazing cultural life in a region that is portrayed by the international media mostly with the sole focus on violent crime.

Falke, who just returned from Tijuana where he was invited to participate in the art festival Tijuana Interzona to present his project LA FRONTERA: Artists along the US Mexican Border, will soon travel along the entire 2000 miles long border and visit cities like Nogales, Juarez, Reynosa and Matamoros. He estimates that he will need at least 3 month on the road to finish the project.

(His work along the border will be shown at the Mexican Cultural Institute of Washington DC beginning November 9.)

He is currently raising funds on IndieGogo to cover expenses. (A modest grant has been awarded by a German foundation).

Here is the link to his fundraiser:

http://www.indiegogo.com/LaFronteraArtistsAlongTheUSMexicanBoder

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As I have mentioned in an earlier post, the Missus and I recently made a trip to the left coast of Amurrrica so I could finally relax from my mediterranean lifestyle. As usual I decided to bring the shabang (2 7bs, 4 heads, and the Mamiya RZ) on our road trip from San Francisco to LA and back.

The project I had in mind originally was to find and photograph motocross riders in the hilly desert of Southern California. It would have worked out great, if only they were there. Even though I found plenty of tracks, I could not rustle up one single rider in the time we were there. Maybe they needed a vacation, too.

So faced with the depressing possibility of schlepping (and paying extra luggage charges for) all my gear without getting anything noteworthy out of it, I sent an SOS call to my good friends Jerry and Laurel in SF. J & L worked already on several other bay area shoots of mine, one of them detailed in great detail in an earlier post here.

Laurel told me about her friend Isabella, who is a passionate mountain biker, though injured at the moment, who could hook me up with other riders. It was very short notice, unpaid, and the shoot was happening on Monday afternoon. Somewhat close to ideal conditions.

After a location scout in different parts of the city, the tourist in me won, and I decided to shoot on the Marin side of the Golden Gate. Obviously it’s one of the mostest oftenest photographed locations ever, but the beauty of the span is just too damn hard to resist. During the scout, we went to some of the military installations in that area and the one closest to the bridge had some interesting structures that provided for good riding and angles without tourists in the background. I tried out different lenses and liked the slightly abstract (safari) look I got from the 250mm tele.

On Monday we started setting up for a one o’clock shoot. We didn’t know how many models would come, but we knew that they wouldn’t have a lot of time. When three riders finally arrived an hour late, the fog rolled in. Initially I was ready to kick something small and innocent, but the fog turned out to be not really solid. Every so often the veil would lift and the bridge would appear in highly attractive half-visibility. Laurel was standing on a little hill, telling us to get ready when a hole in the mist would blow our way. When we got the timing right it looked like this:

…and when we got the timing wrong it looked like that:

The rider in this picture is Remy, who is not just an all around good guy and very skilled rider, but also the owner of the tip-top Mojo Bicycle Cafe in San Francisco. A very nice combo of bike shop and cafe.

We did a quick group portrait (Ralph, Remy, and Isabella),…

…and moved up the hill for a second location. This is how our first spot looked from above:

The second location was on the other side of the hill and had a little patch of spectacular trees. We placed two lights amongst the trees behind the rider, one head pretty much from the front and left of camera and one head from the sharp right aimed at the rider but skimming the gnarly tree next to her. The rider had to start in the background, get some speed, duck under that big branch, get photographed, and roll down a sharp little hill while avoiding the camera. The two guys went first, but then Isabella’s competitive side kicked in and she went for it, too, freshly surgically repaired knee or not, giving me the best image in this spot (and possibly the day).

It was a short little shoot, but more than justified the schlepp.

If you’re into bikes or coffee or both I highly recommend to check out Mojo if you should find yourself (or lose yourself) in San Francisco (with flowers in your hair).

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While putzing around on the Internet (which seems to be my day job) and keeping a semi-interested eye on this year’s Tour de France, I came across some old images of Eddy Merckx. Like many of you will know, Eddy Merckx isn’t just the owner of the coolest name ever, he was also the most dominant bicyclist of his generation. So dominant was he that his nickname was “The Cannibal”.

He also had a way of looking larger than life in pictures. His suffering was of religious proportions…

…his crying on the bed put every teenager to shame…

…and when he got his white socks dirty he didn’t stop at light grey.

I also think that the old guard knew the limits of effective advertising…

…while this picture above makes me want to write with a Bic pen, drive a Peugeot on Michelin tires to a BP station and drink an ice-cold Salvarani (or whatever that is), this picture of the poor (modern day) Schleck brothers only gives me a headache.

There are 28 logos between them just above the belly buttons. Imagine the horror if they were triplets! I mean, is anybody buying a Skoda because it’s the seventh company from Andy Schleck’s left nipple? I don’t think so either.

In any case let’s finish the post with a great picture by Stephan Vanfleteren of the older Merckx and let’s all have a Molteni in his honor.

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During a short and sweet road trip with the missus through Wyoming last year I noticed that there were a lot of bikers out and about and after a while it dawned on me that they were on their way to the big yearly meet-up in Sturgis, South Dakota. Most of them have been on their bikes for days and you could see in their faces the effects of the wind and the sun. It seemed like we could do a nice little portrait series.

The first day we wanted to do the shoot was too rainy and we decided to use the time for a thorough location scout. We drove out of Cody and took the Chief Joseph Byway to the Beartooth Highway, which took us all the way up into Montana. One road was more spectacular than the next. We decided to set up shop the next morning at a place called Dead Indian Pass.
The spot overlooked a beautiful valley where Chief Joseph and the Nez Perce faked out a pursuing US Army on their (painfully close but unsuccessful) run towards the Canadian border.

We set up lights at a pull-out and asked the bikers that stopped there if they wanted to sit for a portrait. I think we got a nice collection of Amurrrican (and a few Canadian) archetypes.

To check out the entire series, click here.

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From the Shameless-Self-Promotion-Dept.: American Photography put up a slide show with all the winners of the 27th edition of their contest. I’m stoked (that’s what we cool people say instead of excited) to have 4 of my Upstream images in there. Watching the slide show is well worth it, there is a ton of great photography from fine shooters working in all the different corners of our field.

Towering above it all, though, is the crown jewel, the Shangri-La, the El Dorado, the creme de la creme of 2010 image making: Jeff Koons’ interpretation of gayness in the animal kingdom:

So hop on over, daahling and enjoy the show.

http://www.ai-ap.com/slideshow/AP/27/
PS: Brace yourself! It starts with a set of images that are a bit tougher than gay bunnies.

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There is a new gallery called “At the Races” on my website.  I spent a day at a messenger track race in Kissena, Queens which has a velodrome (what doesn’t New York have?).  The images were taken last year on the glorious, glorious day when Germany whooped Argentina 4:0 at the World Cup which might explain why it took me so long to post them (I’ve just stopped celebrating).  In any case there will be a longer post about the nuts and bolts of the shoot soon.

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