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Posts Tagged ‘Art’

Even though this dark time of year usually makes me feel a bit of
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and today’s sh**ty ass weather fills me with
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I also feel
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because the good people at the UPI gallery (Laura, Sam and Dave), who inspire much

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in me, held an open call for this here group show
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and after I showed them
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they’ve sent me an email of
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for this body of work.

The opening is on Valentine’s Day and if the prospect of doing the same thing as the last 15 years fills you with
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or the crazy lines expected in restaurants make you feel
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then you should come and check out the show. And of course, don’t feel
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if you don’t have a date, cause we look forward to seeing you with much
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United Photo Industries HQ is located at:
111 Front Street, Suite 204
Brooklyn, NY, 11201

IT’S A THIN LINE BETWEEN LOVE AND HATE
THE 2013 EDITION
HATE: February 14 – 26
Artist Reception: Thursday, February 14, 6-9PM

Our two-part photo invitational has returned!

Exploring the twinned themes of Love, Hate, and the rugged terrain between them, photographers are invited to submit individual images exploring either (or both) elements of our exhibition’s emotionally conflicted theme.

On the surface, love – and its flip side, hate – might seem simple subjects to capture. Our daily lives are filled with mundane declarations of love, and mindless acts of hatred. But love and hate run deep. Look beneath the surface and you will often discover them masquerading as each other.

Please join us for the opening of “LOVE” (February 1, 6-9PM) and “HATE” (February 14, 6-9PM) in homage to February’s emotional roller-coaster and celebrate with us the wonderful work of :

Mariette Pathy Allen
Dirk Anschutz
Susan Barnett
Christopher Capozziello
Alejandra Carles-Tolra
James Carroll
Jodi Concecpcion
Stephanie Diani
Alessandro Falco
Akihiro Furuta
Glenna Gordon
Barbara Habenstreit
Alice Hale
Jamil Hellu
Howard Heyman
Cereal Lab
Ma Liang
Marcia Lloyd
Jennifer Loeber
Meg Lyding
Darius Mccallum
Nick Meyer
Peter Miraglia
Godelieve Mols
Keren Moscovitch
Laura Noel
Julie Nymann
Dominica Paige
Michelle Pedone
Alexis Percival
Hana Pesut
Thalassa Raasch
Jamel Shabazz
Ingrid Spangler
Maria Sprowls Cervantes
Sarah Szwajkos
David Taffet
Colin Todd
Rafael Vargas
Brennan Wesley
Vikky Wilkes
Laine Zimmerman

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From the Toot-My-Own-Horn-Dept.:

I’m very happy to announce that Upstream Brooklyn is going to be in the DUMBO Arts Festival 2012.

The good people from United Photo Industries (that’s the same folks, who organized the very exciting Photoville extravaganza over the summer) will be giving me a shipping container to show my portrait series of Brooklynites with disabilities.

United Cerebral Palsy of New York City (the great organization I partnered with for this shoot) arranged for transportation for the models, so that they can check out their portraits first hand and mingle with the art crowd in the wheelchair accessible container.

Dear reader, I really hope you can make it to DUMBO this weekend to check out the show, see the prints, meet the models and meet the artist. Also, United Photo Industries announced privately that if they’re not happy with the attendance they will lock the artist in the container and make him winter in Elizabeth, NJ. So, please!

Upstream Brooklyn

Portraits of Brooklynites with Disabilities

Part of United Photo Industries’ foto/pods at the DUMBO Arts Festival 2012

Main Street between Water and Plymouth Streets
DUMBO, Brooklyn, NY

Friday, Sept 28th 2012 6PM to 9PM
Saturday, Sept 29th 2012 10AM to 9PM
Sunday, Sept 30th 2012 11AM to 6PM

Upstream Brooklyn is sponsored, in part, by the Greater New York Arts Development Fund of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, administered by Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC).

United Photo Industries

Many thanks to

United Cerebral Palsy of New York City

and

Upstream Arts

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There’s a new gallery on my website with portraits and action shots of some of my NYC soccer colleagues. A more in depth post will follow shortly. In the meantime a big “thumbs up” to Matt Penrose at Groupstage who helped organize the shoot, posted it on his blog, and runs a terrific league, in case you’re looking for a game.

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Here’s a little reminder that the American Photography party will be happening tomorrow night. Since I was lucky enough to get four of my images in the book I will, of course, be there. The price of admission is 50 recession ignoring bucks (unless you’re a very important VIP) but for that kind of money I promise to dress nicely, behave well, and make you feel special (within reason).

November 10, 2011
Angel Orensanz Foundation
172 Norfolk St (off E Houston)
Lower East Side
7-11PM
Open Bar and Food

RSVP here

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My good pal and office mate Myriam Babin is an interior and travel photographer, who branched out a year and a half ago into the blogging business. Her blog New York Kitchen shows her photographs depicting the hustle-bustle and set-up of New York City’s restaurant kitchens. Addressing the inherent frustration that comes from seeing delicious food on a computer screen while sitting in an apartment with a fridge that has nothing but expired condiments, Myriam decided to stage an art event called “On The Line” where you can see her photography as well as taste the food from some of the restaurants shown in the images. So what better time to have a little interview with the New York Kitchenette herself.

Dirk Anschütz: First things first: How did you get started in photography?

Myriam Babin: Originally I thought I wanted to be a painter, but after taking a few classes I came to the realization that it was not meant to be. I hated waiting for the paint to dry. So I started taking photography classes during my second year in art school and was instantly hooked.

DA: How did you get into the profession?

MB:  After college I did several cross country road trips and did a photographic series of motel rooms as an art project. That’s when I became really interested in interior photography. I had a solo show of the motel images at Elizabeth Cherry Contemporary Art in Tucson, AZ, where I lived briefly, and a German editor came to see my show – we had met at Art Santa Fe where I had some work. He hired me to shoot some fashion spreads in upscale hotels for German Cosmo and then for GQ Germany. Then I started showing my book around and a French correspondent for Vogue France assigned me to shoot hotels, boutiques, and restaurants in New York where I had moved back to in the meantime. I started shooting travel photography when this writer became the editor in chief of Air France Madame and brought me along. At Air France Madame I had the chance to shoot travel, interiors – and restaurants – all over the world.

DA: What made you start your blog New York Kitchen.

MB: I live in New York and I wanted to have a project that would have me shooting interiors locally on a regular basis, while giving me visibility in this town that I just didn’t get from being published in Europe. The reason that I picked restaurant kitchens is that they’re utilitarian spaces that nonetheless display a vibrant culture, especially in a food-crazed town like New York. And of course it’s exciting to have the opportunity to see behind the scenes of places where I might love to eat.

DA: What equipment do you use?

MB: I shoot with a Canon 5D with a 24-105 lens. I shoot the establishing shots on a tripod and the details and action shots handheld, using available light for everything.

DA: So tell me about the upcoming event.

MB: The idea is to bring the blog to life, to bring it from virtual to actual. George Uenishi from Digital Plus (a fine printing and mounting place in Gowanus, that did the mounting for The Sultans exhibit I had earlier this year. DA) asked me if I wanted to create a show for the 411 gallery, an exhibition space that’s adjacent and connected to the Digital Plus workshop. I started thinking about how I could create something more than just a photography exhibit. I liked the idea of giving the viewers a chance to not only see images of food being created, but also to experience it. Often times a gallery space can be austere, almost sacred. For this event I want to turn it into something more lively, so I asked restaurants that I’ve photographed if they would be interested in providing food for the event and quite a few were really into the idea. During the show’s opening Market Table, El Quinto Pino, Txikito, Gramercy Tavern, and Chef Gregory Torrech (formerly of Brown and Sixth Street Kitchen) will be serving up their food, some of which will be cooked on the premises.

There will also be a silent auction where one can bid on prints from the show or on dinners at participating restaurants. All the proceeds will be donated to “Share Our Strength” a non-profit dedicated to ending childhood hunger in America.

 

DA: How has the blog affected you business so far?

MB:  I’ve met lots of people including my fiancé who is a chef, and some new clients who have hired me to shoot their restaurants and menu updates.

DA: Thanks a lot for the interview and good luck with “On The Line”.

411 Gallery @ Digital Plus

411 Third Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11215

To RSVP for the event Click here: www.eventbrite.com/event/2275959456

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While I usually get mild to severe anxiety attacks when the name Getty is mentioned these days, it is important to point out that there is a whole other Getty that also has nice images but isn’t trying to sell them for a buck fifty. I’m talking about the Getty Museum in the fair city of Los Angeles.

The Getty Center was made possible by the incredible riches accumulated by this guy:

J. Paul Getty (painted by Gerald L. Brockhurst).

J. Paul figured out a way to sell a gallon of gas for roughly three times the price of a well produced stock image and found himself almost immediately in a fancy villa in Malibu, from which he collected an amazing amount of sweet, sweet artwork. (That’s the short version of the Getty success story).

In any case, the Misses and I went on a little CA road trip recently and one of the stops was LA. I wanted to see the Getty for quite a while now and we made a bee line for it the first chance we got. It sits on a great hilltop overlooking the metropolis that has more smog than a German bar in 1985. The buildings are marvelous designs by Richard Meyer and, together with the campus, the gardens, the sculptures and the view, form a near perfect setting to view art.

There were so many great paintings that I’ve decided to focus on the portraits for this here blog post and so now, without any further ado, some personal favorites from the other Getty:

Isabella of Portugal, Workshop of Rogier van der Weyden Flemish, Flanders, about 1450, later additions about 1500

Portrait Study, Théodore Géricault, French, about 1818 - 1819

St. Bartholomew, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn Dutch, 1661

Portrait of a Bearded Man, Jacopo Bassano, Italian, about 1550

Portrait of Barbara Kressin, Unknown, Netherlandish, 1544

An Old Man in Military Costume, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Dutch, about 1630 - 1631

Pope Clement VII, Sebastiano del Piombo, Italian, about 1531

Portrait of Alfonso d'Avalos, Marquis of Vasto, in Armor with a Page, Titian, Italian, Bologna, probably January-February 1533

Head of a Woman, Michael Sweerts, Flemish, about 1654

Portrait of the Marquesa de Santiago, Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes, Spanish, 1804

Portrait of Anthony Valabrègue, Paul Cézanne, French, about 1869 - 1871

Euclid, Jusepe de Ribera, Spanish, Naples, Italy, about 1630 - 1635

Four Studies of a Male Head, Workshop of Peter Paul Rubens, Flemish, about 1617 - 1620

Self-Portrait, Yawning, Joseph Ducreux, French, before 1783

J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90049-1687

Phone: +1 (310) 440-7330
Fax: +1 (310) 440-7751
E-mail: (for general Museum inquiries) gettymuseum@getty.edu

http://www.getty.edu

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So the good news is that that image above from my Dead Indian Pass series received an honorable mention at the International Photo Awards (the Lucies), but the bad news is that nobody mentioned it to me. I had to find that out all by my poor pitiful self. The same thing happened already last year. My Giddy Up series placed second and I was definitely told about that. I even received an official certificate that I could frame or fold up and keep in my wallet in case I’d ever run into an art director. So last year I was checking out the winners’ gallery and, still basking in my own glory (even though my old coach said placing second only makes you the first loser), moved on to the honorable mentions gallery just to stumble upon The Sultans there.

I didn’t make much of it. I figured it was an honest mistake or maybe they didn’t think I could handle two successes at the same contest without my head swelling up to a grotesque size and exploding and soiling that nicely framed certificate on my wall.

But this year they did it again, not mentioning my honorable mention that is, and now I think they might be doing it on purpose.

I know, it’s not exactly earth shattering news (to be the 7th loser in the 32nd category) and they would have to send out a lot of emails (my picture is about # 1487 from the top) but still, every little bit counts and that’s why we enter contests:  To brag about winning (or being mentioned, honorably at that), to go to an editor or art buyer and proudly proclaim: I’m not just something the cat dragged in, no sir, I’m an award winner, you can trust me with your multi-dollar shoot.

For every photo contest already out there, there are 3 new ones springing up, blunting the effect of all of them.  Generally they charge quite a bit of money and it’s becoming very questionable if entering (and winning in some fashion) any of these is actually worth it, but what’s not questionable to me is this:  If you decide to have honorable mentions in your contest than you should put in the effort to let the mentionees know.  You’re welcome, don’t mention it.

You can check out the winners and honorable mentions here.

 

 

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