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Archive for the ‘Interview’ Category

My good pal and office mate Myriam Babin is an interior and travel photographer, who branched out a year and a half ago into the blogging business. Her blog New York Kitchen shows her photographs depicting the hustle-bustle and set-up of New York City’s restaurant kitchens. Addressing the inherent frustration that comes from seeing delicious food on a computer screen while sitting in an apartment with a fridge that has nothing but expired condiments, Myriam decided to stage an art event called “On The Line” where you can see her photography as well as taste the food from some of the restaurants shown in the images. So what better time to have a little interview with the New York Kitchenette herself.

Dirk Anschütz: First things first: How did you get started in photography?

Myriam Babin: Originally I thought I wanted to be a painter, but after taking a few classes I came to the realization that it was not meant to be. I hated waiting for the paint to dry. So I started taking photography classes during my second year in art school and was instantly hooked.

DA: How did you get into the profession?

MB:  After college I did several cross country road trips and did a photographic series of motel rooms as an art project. That’s when I became really interested in interior photography. I had a solo show of the motel images at Elizabeth Cherry Contemporary Art in Tucson, AZ, where I lived briefly, and a German editor came to see my show – we had met at Art Santa Fe where I had some work. He hired me to shoot some fashion spreads in upscale hotels for German Cosmo and then for GQ Germany. Then I started showing my book around and a French correspondent for Vogue France assigned me to shoot hotels, boutiques, and restaurants in New York where I had moved back to in the meantime. I started shooting travel photography when this writer became the editor in chief of Air France Madame and brought me along. At Air France Madame I had the chance to shoot travel, interiors – and restaurants – all over the world.

DA: What made you start your blog New York Kitchen.

MB: I live in New York and I wanted to have a project that would have me shooting interiors locally on a regular basis, while giving me visibility in this town that I just didn’t get from being published in Europe. The reason that I picked restaurant kitchens is that they’re utilitarian spaces that nonetheless display a vibrant culture, especially in a food-crazed town like New York. And of course it’s exciting to have the opportunity to see behind the scenes of places where I might love to eat.

DA: What equipment do you use?

MB: I shoot with a Canon 5D with a 24-105 lens. I shoot the establishing shots on a tripod and the details and action shots handheld, using available light for everything.

DA: So tell me about the upcoming event.

MB: The idea is to bring the blog to life, to bring it from virtual to actual. George Uenishi from Digital Plus (a fine printing and mounting place in Gowanus, that did the mounting for The Sultans exhibit I had earlier this year. DA) asked me if I wanted to create a show for the 411 gallery, an exhibition space that’s adjacent and connected to the Digital Plus workshop. I started thinking about how I could create something more than just a photography exhibit. I liked the idea of giving the viewers a chance to not only see images of food being created, but also to experience it. Often times a gallery space can be austere, almost sacred. For this event I want to turn it into something more lively, so I asked restaurants that I’ve photographed if they would be interested in providing food for the event and quite a few were really into the idea. During the show’s opening Market Table, El Quinto Pino, Txikito, Gramercy Tavern, and Chef Gregory Torrech (formerly of Brown and Sixth Street Kitchen) will be serving up their food, some of which will be cooked on the premises.

There will also be a silent auction where one can bid on prints from the show or on dinners at participating restaurants. All the proceeds will be donated to “Share Our Strength” a non-profit dedicated to ending childhood hunger in America.

 

DA: How has the blog affected you business so far?

MB:  I’ve met lots of people including my fiancé who is a chef, and some new clients who have hired me to shoot their restaurants and menu updates.

DA: Thanks a lot for the interview and good luck with “On The Line”.

411 Gallery @ Digital Plus

411 Third Avenue
Brooklyn, NY 11215

To RSVP for the event Click here: www.eventbrite.com/event/2275959456

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Alright, Upstream is up and ready for your viewing pleasures at Intermedia Arts in Minneapolis.

Stella Kramer did an interview about this series with yours truly on her very read-worthy Stellazine blog.

If you should find yourself in the winter-wonder-land that is Minneapolis on April 18th stop by at the closing reception. There will be refreshments.

Intermedia Arts
2822 Lyndale Ave. South
Minneapolis, MN 55408
612.871.4444
http://www.intermediaarts.org/

April 5th through April 18th, 2011
Monday-Friday 10AM to 6PM, Saturdays 12PM to 5PM

Closing Reception and Upstream Arts Benefit:
Monday, April 18th, 6:30-8:30 PM

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Dietmar Busse is (primarily) a fine-art photographer living in a one bedroom walk-up in that nondescript neighborhood around lower Lexington Avenue. His apartment has become the set of an amazing series of portraits that he calls “The Visitors”.

In the years that I have known Dietmar he has done some beautiful fashion work,

photographed NYC street-life,

hung out with barbershop beauties,

went full floral,

and documented where he grew up in northern Germany.

His work is intense and calm at the same time and always feels personal. Whenever I stopped by Dietmar’s place over the last few years he had rough prints of new mesmerizing portraits pinned up. I’m very happy that he agreed to be interviewed for The Heavy Light.

Dirk Anschütz: First things first, Dietmar. Why did you become a photographer?

Dietmar Busse: (Laughs) Well, after I finished high school I was not sure what to do. I signed up for Law School in Berlin and went for one day. At the same time I found out that I got accepted for a job in the south of Spain, that I had applied for earlier. I immediately hitchhiked to Badajoz only to find out that I really didn’t like my prospective employers. On my way back to Berlin I stopped in Madrid and met all these creative people, designers, artists, and so on and I became friends with a model and a photographer. I guess somehow I always wanted to be an artist but I never thought of photography as an accessible career and talking to my new friends changed that. I thought, I can do that. The model was friends with Michael Wray, an English photographer and I ended up being his assistant. We often had 2 or 3 shoots in a day. It was insane, but the great thing was that we did everything. Studio, runway, location, still life. I learned everything from 35mm to 4×5. I just received an amazing amount of knowledge in only two years.

DA: How did you decide to come to the US?

DB: After I finished working for Michael (I was exhausted), I felt that there was really not a lot to learn for me anymore in Madrid. I stayed for another two years mostly partying and building up my portfolio, but I knew I had to leave Spain and decided to go to Milan. Then a friend talked me out of it and convinced me to go to New York. I didn’t know anybody except one person who I had met a few weeks earlier in Madrid and who gave me his business card. I called him up and by coincidence his roommate had left and I had a room in New York.

DA: So, let’s talk about “the Visitors”. What made you start that series?

DB: I did so many different things from fashion, reportage, still life to glueing flowers on to myself for a few years. So here, I wanted to start a body of work that was cohesive and coherent. Something that was very focused. I wanted to work on something that I love. I wanted to work on something very simple. I love the intimacy of a studio as opposed to location and I figured, oh, I can do this in my apartment. I like being here and I like to invite people into my little world. I love being with people especially in a small setting and I love people that stand out in society especially visually. I love fashion and I asked people to dress up, so that gave me a chance to bring a fashion aspect into my work without dealing with magazines and agencies and all that.

DA: How did you get people to sit for you? Isabelle Toledo for instance?

DB: I worked with Isabelle Toledo before. I shot her for a magazine in the 90’s. I love her and love her work. It’s people like her that make it exciting to be in New York.

DA: How about Allanah Starr?

DB: Well, in the beginning of the project I would go out and ask people on the street, later I went clubbing to spots that are still pretty crazy. Allanah was referred to me through a friend at a nightclub. A lot of the casting was word of mouth. Or if I wanted to photograph somebody, I tried to find someone that knew that person, so they could make an introduction for me.

DA: Was there anything that surprised you during the project?

DB: No, not really. I guess sometimes I’m surprised by the results. During the shoots of this project I was working in a small studio, locked up almost, with people I really didn’t know. So, there’s an emotional response to that. Sometimes it’s awkward, sometimes it feels like a weird encounter. Sometimes it feels like it wasn’t a good shoot, and then I look at the contacts and they’re great. It’s very intense. I mean the work is intense, because I’m intense (laughs). Sometimes I look at work that I shot a few years ago and I’m amazed at how good it is and I can’t understand why I picked such a mediocre picture as my final selection or why I wasn’t happy with the photographs back then.

DA: What equipment do you use?

DB: (Rolls his eyes, laughs) I’m really not interested in the technical aspects of photography.

DA: Come on, you might not be a gear-head but you create a very specific and consistent look that could not be achieved with any old camera.

DB: Ok, I’m only interested in the technical part as far as it will help me get the results I want. With the set-up here I keep it to the minimum. I only thought about it in the beginning, now everything is always the same. I use a Hasselblad from the 500 series for the quality. I always work with one lens, an 80 mm. I use always strobe, never daylight. The light [an ancient “brown” Speedotron. DA] is always set up, I just have to push the on button and move the stand into position. I painted the background gray, it’s a wall in my apartment. I don’t think about it anymore. That way I can concentrate on the sitter. I don’t change the camera, the film, the light. During the shoot I don’t want to think about the technical part.

When I’m on assignment I always have to adapt to the given situations. Here it’s always the same. That said, I got a new lens recently for close-up work, a 120 mm Macro.

DA: Tell me about the double exposures.

DB: It basically started as an accident. I was printing in a rental lab and exposed a sheet of paper with two negs. First I threw it in the trash, but then I pulled it out again and took it home to look at it. I thought it looked a lot like photo school, but it also just looked right, then I went back to the lab and tried it with a few more negs.

The use of multiple negatives allows me to go past what you see through the viewfinder and explore a world of fantasy.

DA: How do you decide which images to combine?

DB: It has to feel right. I look. I play. What I have as landscapes in black & white is from my village in Northern Germany. So I have to see what’s there. Trees, or cows, or meadows. I look to combine images that have an integrity on their own, that don’t need help. I look at a portrait and I wonder what would he look like with an upside down tree in his face (laughs).

It combines two very strong and influential experiences of mine that are very far apart. My growing up on a small farm in Germany and my life in New York.

DA: You’ve shot some very different projects but there is a combining quality to all your work. How would describe your approach to photography?

DB: I see myself as a story teller. I like to show things that I feel. Photography for me is a way to communicate emotions. A photograph has to feel honest to me.

I’m always interested in showing beauty, even if it’s a fat man with pimples and only one eye (laughs).

DA: Thanks a lot for the interview.

Dietmar Busse’s website

You can also see for yourself where the magic happens, because Dietmar has an open studio this coming Saturday (Dec. 11th) and Sunday (Dec. 12th) from 2 PM to 8 PM
at
120 Lexington Avenue, Apt. 4E (@ 28th Street)
New York, NY 10016
(212)683-0865

All images in this post ©Dietmar Busse.

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